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Nature Notes: Sharp-Shinned Hawk

Nature Notes: Sharp-Shinned Hawk

Ed Robinson
December 20, 2017

]Eirwin Soltesz photo In an earlier article, I described the lovely Cooper’s hawk. Here we will learn more about the smallest member of the same family, the sharp-shinned hawk. These birds, along with the sparrow hawk and goshawk, are members of the genus Accipiter from the Latin word accipere, meaning “to grasp.” The Accipiters are… Read more

Nature Notes: Winter Moth

November finds us enjoying the last of the foliage season, but it can be a busy time getting our homes and lawns cleaned up for winter. It is also a time for action if you have valued deciduous trees. Once the weather turns colder, we will begin to see large numbers of the invasive winter… Read more

Nature Notes: Eastern Larch

Nature Notes: Eastern Larch

Ed Robinson
October 1, 2017

As children, we learned at school that deciduous trees grow new leaves each year, dropping their old leaves in autumn, bringing bright colors to our forests. The conifers or “evergreens” have needles that remain on the trees all year long. It turns out that there are conifers that are also deciduous, and the one closest… Read more

Nature Notes: Hummingbird Moth

Nature Notes: Hummingbird Moth

Ed Robinson
September 1, 2017

If there is one constant about the natural world around us, it is the opportunity to learn something new every day. No matter how long you have been a keen observer and participant in the outdoors, there is always a revelation just waiting to smack you in the forehead. It was my good luck to… Read more

Nature Notes: Ruby-Throated Hummingbird

If I had to nominate the toughest of all the animals in nature on a pound for pound basis, I probably would go with the hummingbird. These tiny birds weigh only three to four grams, but they have a migration path that may exceed 3,000 miles. The most amazing part of their migration is a… Read more

Nature Notes: Water Lilies

Nature Notes: Water Lilies

Ed Robinson
July 28, 2017

Lately I have been enjoying the appearance of water lilies in several large ponds along our local highways. It is easy to see why the French impressionist Claude Monet was inspired to create his famous series of “Water Lilies” canvases, with over 250 paintings of his water garden in the last 30 years of his… Read more

Nature Notes: Roseate Tern

Nature Notes: Roseate Tern

Ed Robinson
May 20, 2017

Several years ago I was introduced to springtime striped bass fishing by a friend with a boat in Duxbury Bay, Massachusetts.  At first light on a bracing May morning, Dale motored slowly around the bay and used high-powered binoculars to scan the water on all sides.  In a few minutes Dale spotted a flock of… Read more

Nature Notes: Spying in the Dark

Nature Notes: Spying in the Dark

Ed Robinson
April 20, 2017

Most people enjoy watching wildlife, but there is a limit to this hobby.  Many species do their best to avoid humans, or they are most active at night.  But there is a great solution to this problem and it can open a new world of viewing for your pleasure, in the comfort of your home…. Read more

Nature Notes: Rockweed

Nature Notes: Rockweed

Ed Robinson
March 20, 2017

In Shakespeare’s classic play, Romeo and Juliet, Juliet resists pressure to drop her lover from the hated Montegue family by arguing that “a rose by any other name would smell as sweet.” Her suggestion that names don’t matter would fall flat when we look at many edible marine species, including sea vegetables, since it is… Read more

Nature Notes: Eastern Bluebird

Nature Notes: Eastern Bluebird

Ed Robinson
February 1, 2017

Curt Chipman photo This winter has been fairly mild, and that may mean you’ll see some of your favorite birds a bit earlier this spring. One of my favorites is the Eastern bluebird (Sialia sialis), a member of the thrush family, known for their soft plumaged, plump figures and melodic calls. If you are lucky… Read more